Contingency Jones Giveaway

Just a quick post this week. The Contingency Jones 3-day Free-Day event is in full swing! If you want a free kindle copy of the first season of this time-twisting, magic-slinging series, you’ll want to do it tonight or tomorrow. It goes back to its regularly scheduled price on July 28, 2016. 😉

Pick up your copy here: https://www.amazon.com/Contingency-Jones-Complete-Season-One-ebook/dp/B01CZDCTTO

If you get it and like it, leave a review so other people will know how awesome it is! Thanks!

Minor Reporting, an Announcement, and The Aeronaut’s Windlass

Most of my current projects are chugging along at one speed or another, but there haven’t been any real milestones. New fiction writing has happened. A novel summary was written. I leveled up a video game character some more. All necessary (yes, even the video gaming), all important, but none of it earthshaking.

I am, however, planning to run a Free Kindle deal on my latest book – Contingency Jones: The Complete Season One – from July 25, 2016 – July 27, 2016. So mark your calendars for that, because I don’t run these kinds of promotions very often. J

I recently listened to audiobook version of Jim Butcher’s book, The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut’s Windlass, as read by Euan Morton. This book has come under fire since its release for reasons both fair and unfair. One of the recurring complaints I’ve seen is that there are chapters told from the perspective of a cat. I think that this is a fair criticism. I don’t think it’s fair because I’ve got a problem with a talking cat, because I don’t. It’s not because I think Butcher handled the perspective of the cat badly, because he didn’t. It’s simply because it happened too often. I admit that I found myself resisting the urge to skip ahead during the cat chapters because they didn’t always convey information that forwarded the story.

That being said, I’ve also seen some criticism that Butcher was off-form when compared to his recent Dresden books, that the world building was poor and that readers couldn’t relate to the characters. To all of those I say, what a load of crap. Go back and re-read the first Dresden book, or the first book in any series you like for that matter, and you’ll discover that it’s shot through with flaws and holes that the author tried to retcon later. This is the first book in a series and, as first books go, it was very cleanly written.

The world building wasn’t brilliantly rendered, but it never is when you’re making up a universe from whole cloth. For the most part, Butcher didn’t info-dump on the readers, but included world building information as and where it could be organically fitted into the story. The world that he built was consistent unto itself and consistent with the neo-Victorian stamp of Steampunk. That approach of organic information inclusion and self-consistency is the best solution to the world-building problem that anyone has come up with so far. It’s also used almost universally by all writers. Knocking Butcher for not transcending the limitations faced by all world-building writers seems both petty and unrealistic.

Yes, some of the characters were assholes. Yes, some of the teenaged characters acted like self-involved, cocky teenagers. Some of the characters were also noble to a fault, duty-bound to a fault, and loyal to a fault. Some characters were compromised by circumstance and some were compromised by choice or position. In other words, the people in the book were like the cross-section of people you meet in real life. Some are good, some are bad, and all are flawed. If you go into any novel expecting to like all or even most of the characters, you probably shouldn’t be reading books aimed at adults.

I’d give The Aeronaut’s Windlass a solid 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it as a breezy, Sunday afternoon read for anyone who professes to enjoy Fantasy/Steampunk.

Hey, I’m Not Dead, Really

So, it’s been a while. Do you remember me? I remember you. Despite outward appearances, this blog/site/author hasn’t died. I’ve just been crazy busy with the writing and ideamancy. So, here’s what’s been going on.

Last year, I wrote 2.5 books. One of them was released as a series of short stories that are now collected and available under the title Contingency Jones: The Complete Season One. You can get yourself an ebook or print edition on Amazon here. It’s a good time, promise. I also completed what I hope will be the first book in a new series. It’s titled, The Midnight Ground. Unlike my previous efforts, I’m preparing this one for submission to agents. I think it’s good enough to secure representation, so I’m foregoing my usual strategy of self-publication until/unless it’s proven to me that no English speaking agent anywhere in the world will represent it. I’m also about to pick up writing again on the half-written book, which takes place in the same universe as The Midnight Ground, but makes only glancing references to characters/event of The Midnight Ground. All told, that accounts for about 250,000 words of productive writing last year and is, I think, a pretty respectable output.

In addition to those projects, I’ve also been working on an audiodrama. For those of you who looked at the word “audiodrama” and thought, “He just made that word up,” I didn’t make it up. It’s a real thing with a proud tradition. In ye olden days of the early- and mid-Twentieth Century there was this really popular device called radio. You might know this device as the thing in your car that plays the stuff on your smartphone/mp3 player. Well before the iPod and largely before the television, radio filled the entertainment void. They used to do these things on the radio called radio dramas and radio serials. These were either one-off or serialized stories that aired on whatever schedule the Powers That Were decided. A few examples you might be aware of are The Shadow radio serial and the Superman radio serial. More contemporary examples include pretty much everything put out by ZBS (you should check them out, because they’re awesome!) and the Prairie Home Companion skits done by Garrison Keillor.

Well why didn’t I say radio drama? It’s not going to land on the radio. It’ll be hosted online somewhere and, being audio only, I’m calling it an audiodrama. The current plan is for a limited run of 9-12 episodes. Why 9-12 episodes? Sanity. This is a labor of love and most of the work will be done by yours truly. I put together the first episode and it ran to about 20 hours of work. I assume that as I get more proficient, each episode will go a little quicker, but it’s just a lot of work. So I’m limiting it to 9-12 episodes. I’m still outlining/writing scripts for it, so the final tally of episodes isn’t set yet. Once I know, you’ll know. Despite already being underway, the timeline for this project is very long. In my ideal universe, this project will see the light of day sometimes in early/mid 2017.

In addition to that, I’ve completed the first draft of scripts for a 5-episode machinima project in cheerful collusion with my brother. I can hear you…“mahchimiwha?” Machinima is a style of filmmaking that uses a video game as the visual core for storytelling. You move your characters around the video game universe to sync up with existing dialogue, capture the footage, and then edit the footage together with dialogue, post production effects, and a soundtrack (if you can afford it or find the right royalty free music) to create episodes. The most famous example of this is probably the early seasons of Rooster Teeth’s series, Red vs Blue, which you can check out here. The later seasons employ pre-rendered animation which, to my mind, makes it less machinima and certainly beyond the means of most machinima filmmakers….though, no less entertaining. As with the audiodrama, the timeline on this is long. Also expecting this to be a project that won’t see public consumption until 2017.

That brings you up to speed on what I have been up to. Upcoming in the Eric’s parade of productive insanity…

There is Contingency Jones: Season Two that’s tentatively set for later this year (fall/early winter). There’s pre-production and production on the audiodrama and machinima projects. Querying agents for The Midnight Ground. Finishing the half-finished novel, as yet untitled. I’ve also tentatively scheduled starting the writing of the 4th Sam Branch novel, Rises, for December 2016. And somewhere between now and mid-2017, I’m planning to get moving on the sequel to The Midnight Ground, which has been tentatively titled, Favors Given. Yup. I’ve got some stuff going on. That said, I will be doing my best to check in with you on my various and sundry projects at much more regular intervals. I’m aiming for once a week.